2017 Seed Catalog Reviews – High Mowing Seeds

High Mowing 2017 Seed Catalog cover If you are one of those people who want organic seed, not matter what and no matter the price, High Mowing if your seed company.  They carry 100% certified organic, non-GMO verified seeds.  That folks, is a big deal.

Having this type of standard does come with a cost though, their seeds are often high priced compared to other companies.

They also carry a large selection of hybrid; non-GMO, varieties.  Although seed savers are not fond of hybrids, those who are looking for new varieties bred for our changing climate are grateful for them. High Mowing is very picky about who they partner with and offer such a large selection of hybrids, from modern hybridizer’s intent on expanding organic seed varieties.  They carry seeds from breeders at Cornel University, Vitalis,  Kultursaat, Genesis Seeds and other University and quality seed breeding programs.

parsnip photoHigh Mowing serves organic growers and is dedicated to providing very high quality seed. A new standout for us this year is their Halblange Parsnip, an open pollinated variety from Bingenheinmer Saatgut, a biodynamic company in Germany.  Shorter and stockier roots are easier to grow in our clay soils, or in gardens where the soil has not been built up so much yet.

https://seeds.bingenheimersaatgut.de/

waldman's dark green lettuce They also carry our hands-down favorite green leaf lettuce, Waldman’s Dark Green.  We also particularly like their selections of radishes and spinach.

Whenever we have a bug or other problem that prompts us to look for a hybrid, we always go to High Mowing first.  We’ve liked Caraflex F1 cabbage and Yaya F1 carrot, all first offered from High Mowing,  so much they have become staples in our differnt colored radishes garden.

As you can see, the folks at High Mowing carry a unique collection of quality varieties from around the world,  Great folks, great seed.  Our only con, is some varieties are above our home gardener recommended price point of being below $4 a packet. You get what you pay for.

What Gardeners Do in Winter

“Oh, you’re a gardener, so what do you do in the winter?  You don’t grow food right?” 

I love this question because there are so many cool things gardeners do in the cold months.

Awesome October harvest
Awesome October harvest

November means cooking up yummy dishes from soups to pies from autumn’s harvest. The more you store in your root cellar, garage, basement and fridge from the year’s bounty, the more bang for the buck you get from your garden. If you get into fermenting and canning, your benefits go up even more.

If you planted a mid-summer crop of potatoes, December is a great time to harvest them. How cool is it to have friends over for dinner for the holidays and servethem fresh potatoes you harvest last week! So cool.

ferment your harvest
Home make kimchee from early winter harvest

December also brings opportunity to share your bounty. You can gift those you love with home grown and dried herbs or fruits.  One year we gave everyone popcorn we grew.  Another year, it was kimchee we made from fall grown cabbage.

December also brings the first of the seed catalogs and these are one of the best things to read while sipping a cup of hot tea/coffee/coco on a cold wintry day in January and February.  This is the time to dream about what you will grow next year .. oh, but wait .. we also do our seed inventory and reflect on what worked and what didn’t during the year with things like:

  • Did we use up seed of our favorite tomato variety?
  • Did anything new we tried do great or horrid, or just so-so?
  • Was there a whole crop fail? This is the time we chat with each other to see if everyone in our community had a bad year with that, or if we need advice on what might have happened in our garden.
Seed Catalogs
Catalogs from some of our recommended companies.

Reading seed catalogs lets us dream of warmer days in spring and plan what we want to do next year in the garden. They also provide useful information and are great resources.

A creative winter garden project is designing the next phase of our garden.  Whether it be the next phase of our long range garden plan (this is the year I put in blueberries and asparagus!) or so a new garden follow-on layout from spring and summer.  Maybe you expand it into fall and winter if you have not yet ventured into four season gardening.

collards are sweeter after frost
Winter collards harvest during snowmageddon

Likely the most rewarding is the continued harvest.  My favorite winter harvest story is from a few years ago during a winter storm dubbed ‘snowmageddon’. It was the biggest snowfall I’d ever been in.  We dug a path to the collards, buried deep in the snow to harvest some for dinner, and honestly they were the sweetest collards I’ve ever eaten.

Harvesting in winter can be less dramatic, simply have a few things in a simple hoop house or cold frame that could be harvestable in winter and certainly when they get a warm day or two to grow a bit and provide more food offerings.

grow food from seed
Young seedlings under lights in winter

Winter is also the time to start early spring and some summer crops.  Your brassicas can be started indoors to be hardened off and planted our as soon as the ground softens up.  Some summer crops like basil and peppers that take a long time to germinate and get growing also benefit from being started in late winter.

I’m also in mid-swing with teaching The Foundations of Organic Gardening Course, which empowers people to be successful gardeners.

Winter is a great time study, dream, muse, plan, order seeds, start seedlings and chat with other gardeners.

Seed Catalog Review: Bountiful Gardens

Bountiful Gardens was much used by Russell when he gardened in California and we have found their seed grows great in Virginia. Some readers may have heard of Ecology Action, John Jeavons or his Grow Biointensive® method of gardening.  Bountiful Gardens is John’s seed company associated with Ecology Action. As they say on their homepage, all their seeds or open-pollinated, non-GMO & Seed Saver friendly. These guys are out to feed the world, in a sustainable organic way.  They have taken the Safe Seed Pledge.

Light Green Lebanese Summer Squash from Bountiful GardensI admit to being in love with their Light Green Lebanese summer squash and their Orange Jelly Turnips.   Their seed packets are perfect for home gardeners because they are small in size, with a price to match.  We also enjoy the diversity of varieties they offer, including plants we have not seen elsewhere,  often from the diverse countries in which they help farmers.

We are not much for seed mixes, but Bountiful Gardens has a Good Companions Collection which is great for anyone wanting to begin companion planting, including flowers and herbs.  The collection has each variety in separate seed packets, a must for a good seed collection.

Catalog Pros:

  • They have the widest selection of books and publications of any of our seed catalogs, so if you are looking to expand your library, Bountiful Garden’s catalog is a good place to see what is out there.
  • Printed on recycled newsprint
  • Their variety descriptions are useful and seem written by people who know the variety
  • Good compost crop information
  • Extensive grain, fiber and oil crops
  • Nice selection of medicinal as well as culinary herbs
  • Interesting selection of unusual varieties from other countries

Catalog Cons:

  • Not many photos
  • No latin names