Dealing with Squash Vine Borers

Hey folks,

Have had a bunch of questions about dealing with squash vine borers.  Here are my 5 ways to deal with them:

  1. Resistant varieties
Debby with two Upper Ground Sweet Potato Squashes she grew
Debby with two Upper Ground Sweet Potato Squashes she grew

You can look for squash vine borer resistant varieties. The only zucchini I grow anymore is Raven, which is a hybrid. It does eventually succumb to the bug pressure, but I at least get a few weeks of zucchini from it before that happens and I take it out. I cannot recommend Black Beauty as it is a real bug magnet.

Southern Exposure Seed Exchange has come varieties you might want to try that are more resistant: for summer squash: Lemon Squash. For winter squash: Green-Striped Cushaw may do well for you. Last year, we did very well with the Upper Ground Sweet Potato Squash (see pic of two Debby grew) which looks like a big tan pumpkin and was a big hit.. that was what was in the photo of me near the end of the presentation. Waltham Butternut is also good at borer resistance and has grown well for me.

  1. Hand removal

Checking daily, or every other day goes along way!  Look at the base of the main stem,  about 4” from the ground up.

If you see a bulge in the stem, there is likely a squash vine borer worm in that bulge.

To remove the worm:

  • make a vertical slit, along the stem:
  • carefully open the stem to find the worm
  • remove the worm and give it a new incarnation
  • carefully close the wound and gently wrap it with tape (the tape is optional, but helps the wound heal and keeps out dirt, etc.)
  1. Crop Rotation

Rotating crops works best if you have a large garden, say at least a couple hundred square feet, or have beds that are on opposite sides of your property.  You want to rotate all members of the cucurbit family as one rotation.  This includes not only winter and summer squash (and zucchini), but also cucumbers and melons (including watermelons).

If you do not have enough space for this, or if you have a major infestation, don’t grow this family of crops for a year or two. I have done this a couple times with good results and got to experiment with new crops in the meantime.

  1. Nematodes

One organic way to deal with these critters is by adding certain nematodes to your soil.  My go-to company for these is Arbico Organics.

  1. Pheromone Lures & Traps

Another purchased option, again from Arbico Organics, are traps with pheromone lures specifically for squash vine borers.

A Final note is that Blue Hubbard squash is known to be a squash vine borer trap crop.  Which admittedly bums us out because we love Blue Hubbard.

Get more Pro Gardening Tips and a chance to get your questions answered

 

Why Grow Your Health?

Grow Your Health logo 2014For three years now I have been honored to be a part of the team who put on the Grow Your Health, Gardening, Local Food and Wellness Festival.

There are several reasons for our participation in this local annual event:

First off, we are passionate about spreading the word of growing your own food. Gardening is a great way to get outside, off our computers for a few, and get back to our roots –  sometimes literally –  in the case of carrots and radishes. Grow Your Health is a great venue to talk gardens and empower people to garden.spring greens in deck house close up

The festival is also about local food. This local festival gets community members together with local farms and healthy food providers in a fun environment.   Connecting folks with our local farmers and practitioners enriches our local economy. It also allows each to expand their community support system. Families supporting family farms was part of how this country was built and these relationship nurture the heart of everyone involved.

The third focus of the festival is wellness, not only of our bodies through various support systems, but also the wellness of the planet that supports us all. The movie we are showing this year, GMO OMG talks primarily about the potential effects of genetically modified organisms in our food, but the business of growing these has major impacts on the wellness of planet earth.

Helping the neGrow-Your-Health-2014-kids-gardening-class-3xt generations learn about healthy practices for themselves and their planet, how to connect with the planet through gardening and knowing where their food comes from is part of the family value this festival can provide. Each year we strive to make the event better for families to attend, more fun for children and provide everyone who attends an enriching community event.

Come out and join us, Saturday, March 28, 10:00 am – 5:30 pm.

Stop by the Prior Unity Garden Booth and sign up for the raffle to win some prizes.

As part of the class lineup, Russell will be part of a Gardening Q&A at 11:00 am and Debby will be teaching Small Space Gardening at 1:30 pm.

We’ll also have spring plants and other cool stuff.

MORE EVENT  INFO

GET TICKETS – Adults $10 in advance, $15 at the door – Children under 16 FREE

deb and russ at the booth – Debby Ward,Founder & Owner of Prior Unity Garden & Management Team Member, Grow Your Health – Gardening, Local Food & Wellness Festival

 

Growing Your Own Tomatoes Saves you Money

Thessaloniki Tomato, great for drought and a good all around open pollinated red tomato
Thessaloniki Tomato, great for drought and a good all around open pollinated red tomato

Lets look at how much money you can save by growing your own organic tomatoes.

Tomato prices at the Farmers Markets are between $3.00 and $5.00 a pound.  Although you are at least supporting a small local farmer, they may not even be organic.  Organic tomato prices at local stores run in the same range.

If we are super conservative, you can easily get 15 tomatoes off one plant even if we have challenging  weather.   Each of those tomatoes (from a  red fruited open pollinated variety like the Old Brooks or Thessaloniki) is 1/2 to 1 1/2 pounds each depending on variety and conditions.  Staying with our conservative model, if those 15 fruits are 1/2 a pound each,  your one tomato plant has given you 7.5 pounds of tomatoes, and would have cost from $22.50 to $37.50 if you bought them. If you got your tomato plant from us at $4.00, subtracting that from your savings total, you still saved from $18.50 to $33.50 and had plenty of tomatoes for several BLTs, salads and a pasta sauce or two – all from one tomato plant in a very conservative model. Plus, they are homegrown, so you didn’t have to go anywhere to get them, thus you saved more money on gas and saved time too by walking to your tomato plant instead of driving somewhere !